PR: trade.io Turns up the Heat With Massive Airdrop – Attractive Trading Competition

PR: trade.io Turns up the Heat With Massive Airdrop – Attractive Trading Competition

This is a paid press release, which contains forward looking statements, and should be treated as advertising or promotional material. Bitcoin.com is not responsible for or liable for any content, accuracy or quality within the press release. CALLING ALL TRADERS!Think you’re good at trading… Well, it’s time to put your skills to the test. Hong Kong – Cryptocurrency exchange, trade.io, continues to make waves in the crypto space as it is set to launch a series of exciting trading competitions to add to their line-up of innovative products and services. In conjunction with the competition, trade.io has partnered with KRATOS to launch a massive airdrop to entice the entire crypto community! More details can be found on our Medium page. To kick off their first competition with a bang, trade.io is offering 1 million KTOS tokens (worth 130,000 USD!) where traders need to trade as many KTOS as they can to have a chance to win a first prize of 200,000 KTOS, or one of 99 more prizes! The tenacious team behind the trade.io name is encouraging their community to challenge friends and other TIOnauts. trade.io’s Chief Operations Officer, Roy Gutshall, shared his excitement on the KTOS competition & airdrop:“We’re thrilled to be launching the trading competition as it adds diversity to our already innovative portfolio of key services and brings value to our TIOnauts who have been eagerly anticipating our next move. “It has been a pleasure to work with KRATOS during their ICO and we are excited to see the evolution of their project with the listing of KTOS on the trade.io Exchange. We believe this generous airdrop and attractive trading competition, will help further promote the adoption of both trade.io and KRATOS platforms. We thank KRATOS for their continued support and opportunity to share in their continued success.” To have a chance of winning your share of 1 million KTOS tokens, here’s what you need to know… How to enter: ● Users must sign up to the trade.io Exchange by 22nd January. Anyone signed up to trade.io Exchange is eligible to participate in the competition.● On Wednesday 23rd January, users will be airdropped 75 KTOS tokens to their account.● KTOS will also be listed on this day, so users can purchase more…

Funding Hate: The Far-Right’s Pivot to Crypto

Funding Hate: The Far-Right’s Pivot to Crypto

Cryptocurrencies were never apolitical. The fateful 2008 Satoshi Nakamoto treatise did not appear in an ideological vacuum: Notions of online privacy, proactive use of cryptography for protecting individual freedom, and denationalization of currency that informed the Bitcoin creator’s vision had been brewing for at least two decades, at least since the rise of the cypherpunk movement in the early 1990s. The libertarian spirit of individual sovereignty and suspicion of governments and central banks has dominated the intellectual milieu where the concept of digital cash was forged and developed into a working technology. As cryptocurrencies went more mainstream, the core community’s ideological purity has somewhat diluted — however, even in 2018, almost half of crypto users identified as either libertarian or conservative, another label that, in the context of the United States, captures a lot of the individual liberty and anti-big government sentiment. Yet, there is another sizable and highly visible group on the right, markedly different from classic libertarians, that is being increasingly drawn to cryptocurrencies for more instrumental than ideological reasons. Often self-identified as conservative or ultra-conservative, the whole ecosystem of hate-mongers, online trolls and conspiracy ideologues — in the mainstream discourse, most often labelled interchangeably as the far-right or alt-right — is turning to crypto as mainstream corporate financial platforms face pressure to disrupt their financial infrastructure. The boundaries of free speech In recent years, a previously fringe movement of radical white nationalists came into the spotlight in the U.S., fueled by growing disenchantment of neoliberal identity politics, a subversive meme culture and increasing fragmentation of online media ecosystems. Much like original crypto-libertarians, those in the alt-right don’t like the incumbent institutions of political and economic power, albeit their reasons are largely different. They take issue with the government because they see it as a major instrument in an insidious plot to undermine the dominance of white people in the Western world. Another weapon in this fight, some of them argue, is the incumbent financial system, run by Jews and designed to perpetuate their veiled power. The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, designed to preserve citizens’ right for dissent against an oppressive government, extends protections to any kind of expression that pertains to the sphere of politics, no matter how outlandish or even hateful it may be.…

SF Summit Shows BitTorrent Is Boosting Tron’s Appeal

SF Summit Shows BitTorrent Is Boosting Tron’s Appeal

“I was very interested in making fun of it.” That’s how crypto YouTuber Ben Armstrong, known around the web as ‘BitBoy,’ described how he felt about Tron prior to its acquisition last summer of file-sharing platform BitTorrent. Now, outside Day 2 of Tron’s niTROn Summit in San Francisco this week, BitBoy felt differently: Tron was worth paying attention to. Sure, the company’s over-the-top marketing exploits (not to mention accusations from crypto luminaries such as Vitalik Buterin of plagiarizing others’ work) were an easy source of derision, BitBoy said. But the BitTorrent move had changed the calculus. It was a sentiment CoinDesk encountered more than once among attendees of the event. When we spoke with Tron founder and CEO Justin Sun after his opening remarks, project promotion was still front of mind. But with BitTorrent in his company’s toolbox, things are at a new level. Moving on from memes and hype, Tron has made a bet that by acquiring this long-standing company at the center of an early protocol it can leapfrog the crypto adoption problem. Introducing cryptocurrency to a huge user base – something legacy internet companies have so far been reluctant to do – is Sun’s new vision. Sun told CoinDesk: “BitTorrent is different, because we already have 100 million active users. I think that is the huge challenge for other companies.” All about users BitTorrent’s permanence has been impressive, but it remains buggy. In short, BitTorrent allows lots of users to quickly download files by breaking them into pieces. If everyone downloads different pieces at the same time, they can all get the file close to equally fast. It’s able to do this by requiring users to also share back the parts that they’ve already downloaded from the system. That’s the crux of its peer-to-peer efficiency. In that way, users are basically bartering bandwidth with each other. Barter systems work OK, but Tron’s BitTorrent thesis is that adding a unit of value, the BitTorrent Token (BTT), will make the system work even better. That was the general message in the presentation by Justin Knoll, an employee at BitTorrent at the time of the acquisition who is now leading Project Atlas, the name for Tron’s bid to roll out BTT to the masses. BitTorrent’s Jusin Knoll…

Japan: Regulators Approve Startup’s Bitcoin Sidechain Trial for Exchanges

Japan: Regulators Approve Startup’s Bitcoin Sidechain Trial for Exchanges

Japanese blockchain development company Crypto Garage announced it had gained regulatory permission to trial its settlement system using Blockstream’s Liquid Sidechain, Cointelegraph Japan reported Jan. 21. Crypto Garage, which claimed to be the first such blockchain finance project to get the green light under the Japanese government’s regulatory sandbox scheme, will now conduct a one-year pilot with a group of participating cryptocurrency exchanges. The product, dubbed Settlenet, uses Liquid as part of an arrangement allowing exchanges to issue yen-pegged stablecoins and trade against Liquid Bitcoin (L-BTC), Blockstream’s sidechain. The feature also makes use of so-called ‘atomic swaps,’ the ability to make cross-blockchain transactions without manually converting assets. “This will enable rapid, secure and confidential transfer of the crypto assets while eradicating counterparty risk,” Crypto Garage wrote in a press release today, Jan. 21: “In addition, Settlenet will provide the regulatory authorities with the functionality to monitor any unlawful trade, including money laundering.” Blockstream launched Liquid as the first public, production-ready Bitcoin sidechain in October 2018. The implementation comes at a crucial time for Japan, which has forged a permissive yet strict regulatory environment for exchanges in particular, following several high-profile hacks over the last twelve months. Coincheck, the platform that lost over half a billion dollars last January, recently announced it had gained full regulatory licensing from the country’s finance regulator, the Financial Services Agency (FSA).

Digital Garage to Test Yen-Pegged Stablecoin on Blockstream Network

Digital Garage to Test Yen-Pegged Stablecoin on Blockstream Network

An arm of Tokyo-listed internet group Digital Garage is working with bitcoin infrastructure startup Blockstream to test the issuance of a Japanese yen-pegged stablecoin. Crypto Garage, a Digital Garage subsidiary focusing on blockchain and crypto tech, announced Monday that it has launched a new platform dubbed SettleNet that would allow app development on Blockstream’s inter-exchange settlement network Liquid, including the issuance of stablecoins. The initiative, slated to last for a year, is one of the first proof-of-concept trials authorized under a regulatory sandbox program managed by the Japanese government, Crypto Garage said. The project aims to let participating members – specifically, crypto exchanges licensed in Japan at this stage – test the SettleNet platform to issue the stablecoin and to provide a settlement service between the stablecoin and crypto assets. Blockstream also participated in building the platform. Crypto Garage said the JPY-pegged stablecoin would trade against Blockstream’s bitcoin-pegged token, Liquid Bitcoin (L-BTC), over its Liquid network. Liquid is a bitcoin sidechain project that went live in October. For the trial, transactions will be conducted in limited volume. Atomic swaps will enable the tokens to be swapped “simultaneously,” said Crypto Garage. The firm continued: “This will enable rapid, secure and confidential transfer of the crypto assets while eradicating counterparty risk. In addition, SettleNet will provide the regulatory authorities with the functionality to monitor any unlawful trade, including money laundering.” Digital Garage initially collaborated with Blockstream in November 2017 with an aim of fostering blockchain development in Japan. Blockstream CEO Adam Back had said at the time: “The Japanese market is ready for new business models that blockchain technologies can enable.” Back in October, Japanese IT giant GMO Internet also announced the plans to issue a yen-pegged stablecoin called GMO Japanese Yen (GJY). The firm said at the time that GJY will be issued to Asian markets in the fiscal year of 2019 via Z.com, its crypto exchange subsidiary. Yen and bitcoin image via Shutterstock 

Review: The Ledger Nano X Adds Bluetooth and a Fussy Mobile App

Review: The Ledger Nano X Adds Bluetooth and a Fussy Mobile App

Reviews There’s a lot to love about Ledger’s hardware wallets. There’s also a lot to loathe. From a design, manufacture, and presentation perspective, they’re a dream. From a software perspective, they’re capricious, prone to connecting and disconnecting on a whim. The new Ledger Nano X continues that tradition. Also read: Ledger Unveils Bluetooth-Enabled Hardware Wallet Nano X: Has Potential, Needs Work I’ve got something of a love-hate relationship with Ledger hardware wallets (HWs). I love their aesthetics and theoretical functionality. I hate their practical functionality, because in practice, Ledgers never work for me. I’ve got four of ‘em sitting in a drawer somewhere, one of which I purchased myself and the others sent by Ledger for reviewing purposes. I managed to get all of them to work, eventually, after much cursing and teeth-gritting, but predicted that I would be unlikely to use those particular devices again. I’ve kept my word. My review edition of the Nano X was great until I unboxed it.The new Ledger Nano X, unveiled at the start of this month, is a device I want to crush on, or at least develop as much of an affinity for a HW as it’s natural for a man to have. And, straight out the box, I feel all those feels. No other HW manufacturer makes devices that look as good as Ledger. You name them – Cold Card, Ellipal, Cobo Vault – I’ve reviewed them and found them functional, but none looked as slick as Ledger’s wallets when the cellophane was peeled off. There’s a much more desirable attribute of hardware wallets, however, than looking good in the palm of the hand, and that’s where Ledger and I don’t see eye to eye. I don’t know if it’s my laptops or my attitude, but Ledgers hate me. I had been hoping their new Nano X, scheduled to ship in March, would end my lousy run of luck with Ledgers, but it wasn’t to be. ‘Our Most Advanced Hardware Wallet Yet’ Ledger’s “most advanced hardware wallet yet” is basically the best-selling Nano with Bluetooth bolted on, an extra button, and the new Ledger Live mobile app as a companion. The X is the future of Ledger’s production line, with the original Nano now reduced to…

Alistair Milne: Bitcoin Is Only Public Blockchain Certain to Last for Next 100 Years

Alistair Milne: Bitcoin Is Only Public Blockchain Certain to Last for Next 100 Years

The next cryptocurrency bull run will decide which public blockchains become the defining names of the industry, United Kingdom-based investor and entrepreneur Alistair Milne predicted in a Twitter thread Jan. 19. Milne, who is well known on Twitter in particular as a source of bullish statements about Bitcoin (BTC), said that any new price highs for the largest cryptocurrency should surpass those of 2017. “The probability that Bitcoin matches its ATH [all-time high] price again and doesn’t then continue past it seems very low. Each wave of adoption is an order of magnitude bigger than the last,” he wrote in a thread on Saturday. Bitcoin continues to trade around 80 percent lower than at its peak in December 2017, when its price reached more than $20,000 on some exchanges. The persisting downturn has led to multiple accusations from high-profile economics figures — such as economist Nouriel Roubini — that Bitcoin is trending to zero, an argument proponents, including Milne, contest. “It takes time for sentiment to change. 30-50million [sic] people owning crypto is not the industry’s peak,” Milne continued, adding boldly: “The next bull run will decide which public blockchains persist for the next 100 years. I believe Bitcoin is currently the *only* sure thing[.]” Milne also highlighted institutional investor interest and Bitcoin’s profile as “gold 2.0” in aiding the next round of adoption. BTC/USD has lost around 5 percent over the past 24 hours, trading just over $3,500 by press time.   In December, the CEO of Japanese fintech firm and crypto exchange operator Quoine forecast Bitcoin hitting new all-time highs this year. Prior to that, fellow investor Michael Novogratz likewise claimed the leading cryptocurrency could pass its $20,000 ceiling by 2020.

How US Government Shutdown Affects Bitcoin ETF Approval

How US Government Shutdown Affects Bitcoin ETF Approval

Regulation The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is due to make a decision on the Vaneck Solidx bitcoin ETF next month, and the deadline cannot be extended further. However, since the U.S. government is currently shut down, a securities lawyer explains what is likely to happen to the ETF, including the likelihood of an automatic approval. Also read: Indian Supreme Court Moves Crypto Hearing, Community Calls for Positive Regulations ETF Could Be Automatically Approved Jake Chervinsky, a lawyer who focuses on litigation involving securities, commodities, futures and other derivatives, explained in a series of tweets on Friday how the current U.S. government shutdown could affect the upcoming decision on the Vaneck Solidx bitcoin exchange-traded fund (ETF). The commission has designated a date by which it shall either approve or disapprove the proposed rule change filed by Cboe BZX Exchange to list and trade shares of Vaneck Solidx Bitcoin Trust. The “final deadline to approve or deny the ETF is February 27. That’s 240 days after the ETF proposal was first published in the Federal Register,” Chervinsky tweeted, emphasizing: The SEC doesn’t have the power to extend the 240-day deadline. The statute absolutely prohibits any further delays … By law, that means if the SEC fails to make a decision by the February 27 deadline, the ETF will be automatically approved. However, he proceeded to explain why it is “*extremely* unlikely” that the bitcoin ETF will be automatically approved. SEC Not Totally Shut Down While many U.S. government departments have completely shut down due to political deadlock between President Trump and Congress over the southern border wall, the SEC posted a notice on its website stating that “Effective Thursday, Dec. 27 and until further notice, the agency will have a very limited number of staff members available.” The commission added that they will “respond to emergency situations involving market integrity and investor protection, including law enforcement.” The SEC has posted its operational plan during a shutdown on its website. The document explains that the agency will discontinue “review and approval of applications for registration . . . with respect to new financial products,” which include bitcoin ETFs, Chervinsky clarified. He believes that the commission views “preventing controversial financial products like bitcoin ETFs from being auto-approved due…

Proof-of-Stake Could Lead to Crypto Banking. Let’s Avoid That

Proof-of-Stake Could Lead to Crypto Banking. Let’s Avoid That

Michael J. Casey is the chairman of CoinDesk’s advisory board and a senior advisor for blockchain research at MIT’s Digital Currency Initiative. The following article originally appeared in CoinDesk Weekly, a custom-curated newsletter delivered every Sunday exclusively to our subscribers. ___________ With last week’s Constantinople delay offering a reminder that ethereum faces challenges in its long roadmap to migrate from a proof-of-work (POW) consensus algorithm to proof-of-stake (POS), it’s easy to miss the fact that elsewhere in crypto-land, POS is already a thing. A little-discussed ramification is that POS will drive new business and financial models for cryptocurrencies, which will, in turn, give rise to a new regulatory and security challenges. Viewed through the prism of traditional finance, a consensus model in which owners of cryptocurrency earn block rewards when they stake, or deposit, their holdings to “vote” on ledger validation starts to look a bit like an interest-earning function. And when third parties, such as those that are starting to provide “staking as a service,” do this on behalf of coin-holders who trust them to provide custody and exchange functions, it starts to look like banking. That assessment would rightly alarm crypto traditionalists. And it’s one reason why some warn against these attempts to improve on the POW model on which bitcoin is founded, arguing that POS will diminish security and incentivize centralization. But although the Lightning Network and other “Layer 2” solutions may help bitcoin and other POW coins resolve scalability and cost problems, proof of work faces real challenges both in terms of computational efficiency and in its public perception as an environmental threat. As such, it’s hard to imagine there won’t be continued and growing support for chains using proof of stake and its cousin, delegated proof of stake (DPoS), which draws from notions of representative democracy to increase efficiency at the cost of some centralization. Already, out of the 19 leading blockchain projects reviewed on CoinDesk’s Crypto-Economics Explorer, three – Cardano, Dash and Qtum — are using proof of stake and another three – EOS, Lisk and Tron – use DPOS. Four of those six are among the top 15 ranked cryptocurrencies cited by CoinMarketCap.com, collectively accounting for $6 billion in coin value as of Friday afternoon. If we added ethereum…

Regulations Have Ruined the Physical Bitcoin Industry

Regulations Have Ruined the Physical Bitcoin Industry

Economy & Regulation As bitcoiners celebrate the 10th anniversary of Satoshi’s invention, veteran enthusiasts will be aware that a lot has changed since the early days. One business that was once incredibly popular is the art of manufacturing loaded physical bitcoins. Government regulations have forced operations to cease, causing the physical bitcoin minting business to virtually grind to a halt.   Also read: 8 Crypto Debit Cards You Can Use Around the World Right Now  Manufacturing Loaded Physical Bitcoins Is a Lost Art Not long after Bitcoin was launched, people managed to create paper wallets and soon the concept of physical bitcoins was born. After that, individuals took the idea to another level and minted metal bitcoins were created. Casascius coins quickly became a collector’s item with these shiny keepsakes loaded with digital currency. However, after Mike Caldwell, the creator of Casascius coins, started selling his physical bitcoins loaded with whole units or fractions of BTC, he was shut down by the U.S. Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN). The U.S. regulator considered minting Casascius coins illegal money transmission and Caldwell had to stop selling loaded coins. Since then a number of other manufacturers have attempted to sell loaded bitcoins to investors who may find numismatic value in these physical collections. This Casascius coin funded with 1BTC sold for $28,700 on Ebay a year ago on Jan. 13, 2018. At the time of sale, 1BTC was worth $14,300.From 2013-2016, physical bitcoins were extremely popular and demand for these coins has remained robust among collectors. Some rare Casascius coins have sold for more than 4-10X their loaded value. In the early days there were so many physical bitcoins that cryptocurrency proponent Elias Ahonen managed to author an entire encyclopedia of physical bitcoins. In recent years, however, the art of molding loaded physical bitcoins is all but lost. Companies like Ravenbit, Alitin Mint, Cryptmint and Titan Bitcoin have all gone out of business. Last April the Japanese manufacturer Satori Coin told customers it was forced to close operations due to the Financial Services Agency’s AML/KYC standards introduced in 2018. Similarly, the cryptocurrency firm BTCC launched its own physical bitcoin forge and ended its operations in October 2018. Loaded Titan Bitcoins. The physical bitcoin manufacturer Titan is no longer in business.…